Which Is The Cheapest Hardwood?

If you’re in the market for new flooring, you may be wondering which is the cheapest hardwood. There are a few things to consider when choosing a wood floor: the type of wood, the grade of wood, and the installation method. These things are important to consider for not only your woodworking business but also for your room decor.

In this blog post, we will discuss all of these factors and help you choose the cheapest hardwood for your needs!

cheapest hardwood

Which is The Cheapest Hardwood? (Top 7)

Maple is one of the cheapest hardwoods. However, there are many other affordable hardwoods available in the market that costs you a fraction of the expensive ones.

Let’s look into some of the five best ones.

1. Maple

Maple is a hardwood that is popular among homeowners for its elegant grain pattern and affordable price. This type of wood is also easy to clean and maintain, making it a great choice for busy families.

Grade: Maple can be found in both solid and engineered form.

Installation: Nail down, glue down, or float.

Cost: $0.75-$12 per square foot.

Janka hardness: 1450

Pros: Maple is a very popular hardwood because it is both beautiful and affordable. It is also easy to clean and maintain.

Cons: Some people find that maple can be too light in color for their taste.

2. Alder

Alder is a light-colored hardwood that is often used in cabinetry and furniture. It is also a popular flooring choice because it is affordable and easy to install.

Grade: Alder can be found in both solid and engineered form.

Installation: Nail down, glue down, or float.

Cost: $0.75-$12 per square foot.

Janka hardness:590

Pros: Alder is a beautiful light-colored hardwood that is very affordable. It is also easy to install.

Cons: Some people find that alder can be too soft for flooring, and it may dent or scratch easily.

3. White Oak

White oak is a classic hardwood that has been used for centuries in both Europe and America. It is known for its durability and resistance to wear and tear. White oak is also a popular choice for flooring because it is easy to install and maintain.

Grade: White oak can be found in both solid and engineered forms.

Installation: Nail down, glue down, or float.

Cost: $0.75-$12 per square foot.

Janka hardness: 1360

Pros: White oak is a classic hardwood that is very durable. It is also easy to install and maintain.

Cons: Some people find that white oak can be too dark in color for their taste.

4. Ash

Ash is a light-colored hardwood that has a beautiful grain pattern. It is also very durable and resistant to wear and tear.

Grade: Ash can be found in both solid and engineered forms.

Installation: Nail down, glue down, or float.

Cost: $0.75-$12 per square foot.

Janka hardness: 1320

Pros: Ash is a beautiful light-colored hardwood with a stunning grain pattern. It is also very durable.

Cons: Some people find that ash can be too soft for flooring, and it may dent or scratch easily.

5. Walnut

Walnut is a dark-colored hardwood that is very popular for flooring. It is also one of the most expensive hardwoods on the market.

Grade: Walnut can be found in both solid and engineered form.

Installation: Nail down, glue down, or float.

Cost: $0.75-$12 per square foot.

Janka hardness: 1010

Pros: Walnut is a beautiful dark-colored hardwood that is very durable. It is also one of the most expensive hardwoods on the market.

Cons: Some people find that walnut can be too dark in color for their taste, and it is also one of the most expensive hardwoods on the market.

6. Koa

Koa is a beautiful hardwood that is native to Hawaii. It is known for its stunning grain pattern and durability.

Grade: Koa can be found in both solid and engineered forms.

Installation: Nail down, glue down, or float.

Cost: $0.75-$12 per square foot.

Janka hardness: 1290

Pros: Koa is a beautiful hardwood that is native to Hawaii. It is known for its stunning grain pattern and durability.

Cons: Koa can be expensive, and it is not as common as other types of wood.

7. Beech

Beech is a light-colored hardwood that is often used in cabinetry and furniture. It is also a popular flooring choice because it is affordable and easy to install.

Grade: Beech can be found in both solid and engineered forms.

Installation: Nail down, glue down, or float.

Cost: $0.75-$12 per square foot.

Janka hardness: 1010

Pros: Beech is a beautiful light-colored hardwood that is affordable and easy to install.

Cons: Some people find that beech can be too soft for flooring, and it may dent or scratch easily.

Benefits of Using Hardwood

Take a look at some of the major benefits of using hardwood.

Hardwood flooring is a popular choice because it is beautiful, durable, and easy to maintain.

It can be installed in a variety of ways, including nail down, glue down, or float.

There are many different types and grades of hardwood available, so you can find the perfect one for your needs and budget.

Cons of Using Hardwood Flooring

Let’s have a look at some of the cons of using hardwood flooring.

Some people find that hardwood can be too soft for flooring, and it may dent or scratch easily.

It is also one of the most expensive flooring options available.

What Is The Difference Between Hardwood & Softwood?

Hardwood is a type of wood that comes from deciduous trees. These are trees that lose their leaves every year. Hardwood is denser and more durable than softwood.

Softwood is a type of wood that comes from evergreen trees. These are trees that keep their leaves all year round. Softwood is less dense and not as durable as hardwood.

How To Choose The Hardwood According To Your Needs?

When choosing the right type of hardwood for your needs, you should consider the color, grain pattern, and hardness of the wood. You should also think about how much money you want to spend and whether or not wood is a common species. If you are unsure which type of hardwood is best for you, consult with a flooring specialist.

Conclusion

Now that you know more about hardwood, you can decide if it is the right flooring choice for your needs. Remember to consider the cost, hardness, and grain pattern of the wood before making your final decision. With so many different types of hardwood available, you are sure to find the perfect one for your home.